How the Harlem Renaissance woke America

The Harlem Renaissance was a game changer. as a much a cultural awakening for the African American community as for the United States as a whole.

Thrusting black voices into pop culture, creating a new crop of black artists and cultural icons and most importantly; fostering a pride that hadn’t been allowed to exist before.

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A 1928 copy of Negro American Magazine, fearing civil rights campaigner, Erma Seweatt

The first generation of people born free had a fight on their hands. Removed from the shackles of slavery, they were still oppressed and persecuted in their own country.

So, it shouldn’t come as a huge shock that throughout the 1920s and 30s many chose to leave the Southern states and instead head for Northern cities like Chicago and New York, where things were a whole lot more progressive.

Faced with these new bright lights, they didn’t back down. Forming communities and using art, literature, theatre and music to express themselves, their history and their future.

Strange Fruit

One of the most acclaimed artists to come from the Harlem Renaissance is the one and only Billie Holiday. Billie Holiday .jpg

Billie came up during the renaissance and it was here she grew her voice. Famed for touching upon subjects other singers shied away from; perhaps her most iconic song is Strange Fruit.

Recorded in the late 1930s, Strange Fruit deals with lynching. Blunt and unflinching it soon became a protest song.

Southern trees bear a strange fruit

Blood on the leaves and blood at the root

Black body swinging in the Southern breeze

Though Billie feared repercussions for performing the song, she felt compelled to continue singing. After all it was the the truth, not just for her, but for everyone in America.

Strange Fruit became a stalwart Billie Holiday number for her – yet her record company refused to print it.  Strange Fruit .gif

Remember this was the 1930s. The civil rights movement was just a seed. Such public protests were unheard of and tended to end with, well, lynching. But Strange Fruit couldn’t be contained, eventually being released as a single by Comodor.

Strange Fruit remains a protest strong and a vital reminder of this dark time in Americas history. But it’s still banned by some.

When English singer, Rebecca Fergerson, was asked to perform at Donald Trumps inauguration, she agreed…if she could sing Strange Fruit. You can guess what Trump said.

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He said no (because he is a wanker)

Shuffle Along

In an era when ‘one black per bill’ was the theatrical norm, musical Shuffle Along high kicked in and smashed every existing idea of what African Americans could contribute to theatre to shittery and back.

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The chorus of Shuffle Along taking a break from ass kicking

Now I know musical theatre doesn’t seem like the tool with which groundbreaking cultural change occurs

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Much rainbow, such social change

But forget what you think you know. Shuffle Along contains absolutely no technicolor dreamcoats, no needy scarred blokes living below opera houses and no jazz hands (ok fine-maybe some jazz hands)

Produced and written by an all black team and starring a black cast, Shuffle Along shook shit up when it made its debut on the early 1920s, with many of the cast enjoying their Broadway debut (including the incredible Josephine Baker!)

The musical revolved around a mayoral election (of course!) but the politics wasn’t confined to the stage. Shuffle Along 2.jpg

Shuffle Along took off, engaging with theatre goers from all backgrounds. It proved to Theatre bigwigs that even with a cast and creative team who comprised of waaay more than ‘one black’-the public didn’t care; they wanted to pay to see the show. In fact they wanted to see more shows led by African American casts and creatives!

Bigger than that (and it’s a pretty big biggy) the huge popularity of Shuffle Along led to the 1920s desegregation of theatres. For the first time, black theatre goers didn’t have to watch from way up in the gods; at Shuffle Along they could sit up at the front.

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See, isn’t musical theatre great!

The Cotton club

For all the groundbreaking being done uptown, racism still existed in Harlem as it did across America. One such hot bed was popular night club, The Cotton Club.

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Ok it looks fun…but trust me its not!

As it’s name suggests, the cotton club wasn’t a haven for any form of equality, with the clubs owner, gangster Owen ‘the killer’ Madden wanting his club to ooze ‘stylish plantation’ and insisting on only playing ‘jungle music’ for his all white patrons.

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Surprising that someone with the middle name ‘killer’ is also a cock

But there was light! For all the Cotton Clubs racism, it’s all African American workforce was tenacious and somehow managed to turn the clubs stage into one of modern jazz’s early breeding grounds.

Acclaimed musical pioneer, Duke Ellington, served as the Cotton Clubs band leader during the late twenties. There He formed one of history’s greatest jazz orchestras and soon their music took over Americas radio stations.

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Duke Ellington

After Duke left for far greener (and less racist) pastures, a new bandleader was appointed-the equally groundbreaking, Cab Calloway. Cab brought drama and flair to the clubs music, in addition to call and repeat scatting that can be seen in still iconic tracks like Minnie the Moocher.

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Now those…those are moves.

Yet despite the acclaimed music on stage, the Cotton Club remained determinedly segregated. So it’s perhaps no bad thing that it was forced to close during the Harlem race riots of 1935.

The seeds of civil rights

1935s Harlem race riot effectively ended the renaissance. Much like the Cotton Club, Harlem was a hive of contradictions. Whilst it’s art celebrated the community and was applauded at the highest levels, many of Harlem’s occupants were essentially living in slums.

Things were uneasy. And After rumours ran rife that a young Puerto Rican teen had been beaten to death for shoplifting, the riot was sparked.

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Police arrest a man during the 1935 riot

The renaissance art left its impact though. It lay a groundwork of pride and built a clear community voice that would be developed when the civil rights movement started to emerge following WW2.

The music, theatre and talent of this era would become forever synonymous of black culture. Whilst WW2 waged on and civil rights waited, the renaissance artists work served as a lingering reminder of everything that could be and one day would be achieved

The Worst Women In History (Vol 1)

Here at F Yeah History we’re all about celebrating women, but some people are just unavoidably the worst.

Sure maybe they achieved a lot, maybe they are badassery incarnate, and maybe they accomplished a lot… but they’re also kinda, sorta massive dicks

So without further ado here are the wort women in history:

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I made this all cute to make up for the horrors ahead – you’re welcome 😘

Ching Shih

Former sex worker turned pirate, Ching Shih ran one of the largest and most feared fleet of pirates in the world. Ching Shih

Ching was married to the leader of the Red Flag Fleet, a much reviled and respected pirate armada. When her husband was killed during a tsunami, Ching took over.

If her men thought they were going to have it easy with a woman at the helm, they were sorely mistaken. To say Ching ran things with an iron fist would be an understatement:

Chings code:

-Disobeyed an order? you’re getting beheaded
– looted plunder? Beheaded
– stole from an allied town? Beheaded.
– raped a female prisoner? oooo you best know you’re getting beheaded 

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And you thought your boss was bad…

But despite all the rules, Ching Shihs pirates were allowed to marry female captives. BUT if their leader heard that they were in anyway messing their new wives around… well hopefully they weren’t to emotionally attached to that whole ‘having a head’ thing.

Yet Ching’s steely control worked and under her rule The Red Flag fleet grew in both infamy and size.

By 1808 Ching had amassed an armada of thousands and was in control of well over 70,000 men. It was then the Chinese government felt that maybe they’d let things go a bit far, and that Ching needed to be reigned in.

An imperial fleet was sent after Ching and she met them head on; the government didn’t stand a chance.

By the end of the battle Ching had actually expanded her fleet (capturing Chinese sailors and offering them the choice of joining her ranks or a bloody death) Ching Shih fighting

For two years the Chinese government tried to destroy the Red Flag, even roping in the British Navy for help. But they just couldn’t beat Ching.

The Chinese knew that things had gone fully tits up when The Admiral of the Chinese navy actually committed suicide rather than face capture by Ching.

So they opened up amnesty negotiations with Ching. But rather then ask for clemency Ching fought for the right to retire.

Obviously nobody said no (if we’ve learnt anything, it’s don’t fucking mess with a Pirate Queen) And so Ching retired to the country where she spent the remainder of her days running a brothel and gambling.

Caterina Sforzia

Born in 1463 Caterina was the illegitimate daughter of the Duke of Milan; one of Europe’s most notorious dicks.

The Duke loved nothing more than planning out horrifying torturous deaths for his enemies, tearing them limb from limb, burying them alive – whatever took his fancy.

…Caterina took after her Dad.

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The fucking death stare on this one!

At just 10 Caterina was married off to the Pope’s nephew and a few years later the pair left for the life at the Vatican.

There Caterina was transformed from a teenager to a powerful and famously ruthless courtier.

But Caterina’s world was turned upside down in 1484 when the Pope died and suddenly shit got very real, very quick.

Riots and rebellions spread like wildfire. With Caterinas husband off fighting fires she was left to hold down a fortress whilst seven months pregnant. As you do.

Fortunately (or not, if you were her enemy) this was the famously ruthless and cunning Catarina; she took to life at war like a duck to water.

Having proved her tenacity and strength, people started to turn to Caterina rather than her far weaker husband.

It’s unsurprising then that when her husband was named ruler of Imola and Forli, it was kind of obvious who was really in control.

This was exhibited for all to see following a revolt in Forli. Caterina rode out to Forli to take control of the situation and nice lady that she was, she personally oversaw every detail of the brutal torture and execution of those involved.

oh dear god no.gifBut brutal executions can only quell a people for so long and following a tax increase the people of Forli had had enough.

in 1488 Caterina’s husband was murdered by the Orsis family while he ate dinner (the Orsis were one of Forli’s top noble families – it’s all very Game Of Thrones)

Caterina and the children were now prisoners, but if the Orsis thought a woman and some kids were going to be easy captives then they were veeeery wrong.

Caterina tricked the Orsis into letting her out of confinement, offering to help them convince other strongholds to surrender to the Orsis. They agreed and even let her go in alone to bargain with one fortress so long as Caterina left her children behind as hostages.

Once inside the stronghold, Caterina obviously immediately started organising an attack on the Orsis…

When the Orsis reminded her that if she went ahead with her plans they’d kill her children, Caterina climbed the fortress walls, hiked up her skirt and explained that they were welcome to kill her kids, hell kill them in front of her if they really fancied, because she had the tools to make more.

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Mum of the year right here!

Somehow, despite Caterina, the kids stayed alive.

Caterina herself managed to hold out within the fortress, and sent out a message to Forli:

‘My people, people of Forlì! I tell you to punish and kill all enemies. For it I will consider you my good brothers for evermore. Do not hesitate to act, and fear nothing, because the deed will benefit you and your children. And if you fail to act you will regret it in a few days.’ 

The veiled threat worked!

The people of Forli took to the streets and Caterina left the fortress where she was reunited with her children (who I bet were just thrilled to see her…) Unsurprisingly Caterina’s next step was to hunt down her new enemies and brutally kill them, as was her style.

Linda Hazzard

Born in 1867 in Minnesota, Linda Hazard was in many ways a woman ahead of her time. A female doctor in an era when this was unheard of; a successful author and driven as all hell to boot!

But before we get out the  marching band and erect this bitch a statue, I should also point out that Linda murdered a metric shit ton of her patients.

Linda Hazzard
God damn it Linda!

You see, Linda believed that starvation could cure all diseases.

She practiced this theory in Minneapolis, but after one of her patients actually DIED of starvation, Linda was threatened with legal action.

Ironically she was saved from jail, as she didn’t actually have a medical license.

Though she escaped jail this incident was enough to convince Linda to get the hell out of dodge. So she moved to Washington, where thanks to a legal loophole she could practice medicine legally.

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Yup, seems legit

In Washington Linda opened up Wilderness Heights, a health farm in the Countryside where she promised to fix all medical ailments through starvation. Linda’s  passion – which verged on fanaticism – quickly helped her build up a fan base of loyal followers.

Life at Wilderness Heights was tough for the guests (who paid though the nose to be there). In addition to a diet of essentially no food, Linda also helped them ‘tackle disease’ by enforcing daily enemas, scalding hot baths and massages that verged on beatings.

Some of Linda’s (mainly already really ill) patients just couldn’t take it and soon the emiciated and bruised bodies started to pile up.

Yet people continued to come.

Linda’s ‘health farm’ had became like some kind of cult; the danger was clear, the deaths abound, but followers kept coming. Two such followers were Dorothea and Claire Williamson, wealthy socialite sisters with a hypochondriac streak.

The sisters arrived healthy but within just months, one would be dead.

Under Linda’s supervision the two women entered into a strict diet of almost no sustanace. Within two months the women weighed just 70 pounds. Yet they choose to remain in Linda’s care, most likely as they had deteriorated to much to refuse her.

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I’m sorry, it gets worse

But help was coming!

Dorothea had sent a cryptic letter to an old Nanny. Worried the women came to visit the sisters. On arrival she was told that Claire was dead and she found Dorothea 50 pounds and close to death.

Thanks to the sisters social standing, Claire’s death registered with the authorities (though more than 14 people had already died of starvation under Linda’s care)

Linda was stripped of her license to practice medicine and given 2-20 years in prison.

She of course got out of jail after 2 years.

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God damn it Linda!

Linda traveled to New Zealand where she once more set up shop and peddled starvation as medicine. Several years later she moved back to Washington and set up another ‘health camp’

Again patients died (Linda was fined a whole £100!). Luckily after almost a decade the place burned to the ground in 1935.

Linda appears to have taken this as a sign and slowed down, which clearly wasn’t good for her health.

In 1938 she took ill and died after trying to starve herself back to health. Shame.

Elizabeth Bathory

Now whilst the prior entries on our list have committed dickery in the name of wealth, power and progress… Elizabeth Bathory was just a plain old dick.

Like really. She’s the literal worst.

Elizabeth Bathory
THE WORST!

Elizabeth came from a long lineage of distinguished Hungarian nobility and so, naturally, as a noble woman in the 1500s she was married off at 15.

Her new husband was famed for his cruelty, but fortunately Elizabeth was fully on board with this!

Legend has it that Elizabeth’s new husband lovingly gifted her with her own personal torture chamber (because fuck Barbies dream house!)

Together the couple blissfully lived life in thier castle, occasionally brutalising errant wrong doers from the villages they ruled over.

Then in 1604 Elizabeth’s husband died and, now in her 40’s, she was left to rule alone.

Elizabeth relished her solo role. Everything was going swimmingly until 1610, when word started to spread that Elizabeth had some… er, nefarious hobbies.

That winter a group of soldiers came to Elizabeth’s home and arrested her. From here shit went downhill fast.

Now, it was well known that Elizabeth was partial to a bit of light murder and torture, but it soon transpired that she had been getting up to some seriously bloody high jinks.

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Like this…but x10

Elizabeth was accused of murdering over 600 people, most young women. She did this in many and various ways, but here are just some:

– stuck red hot needles under peoples nails and skin.
– starved people to death (Hey Linda!)
– made one woman cook and eat her own flesh
– sticking red hot irons in very very uncomfortable places – – – covering girls in honey and leaving them outside on a hot sunny day to be slowly devoured by insects. 

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I told you. THE WORST

She was tried for murder, but due to her influential family ties was spared the death penalty (the same cannot be said for her closest servants, who were all executed)

Elizabeth spent the remainder of her days locked within the walls of her castle. Bricked up inside her quarters with only a crack in the wall for air and food.

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I mean, I guess it’s a happy ending?

Wow this was really interesting! How can I found out more? Volume 2 will be coming very soon, so keep an eye out! In the meantime you can discover one kickass woman a day on my Twitter. And a huge thank to the lovely Tweeps that suggested women for this article, you guys really are the best!!

The real Schuyler sisters

Born into a political powerhouse, the Schuyler sisters, Angelica, Eliza and Peggy were expected to make something of themselves. Their Father was a General in the American revolutionary army and the sisters spent their early lives surrounded by the likes of George Washington. Yet despite their incredible upbringing nobody could have expected that one day Angelica (the eldest), Eliza (the middle child) and Margarita ‘Peggy’ (the youngest) would help shape America.

Angelica

Witty, bright and razorsharp; Angelica Schuyler was born in 1756

Angelica Schuyler portrait
Pictured in later life with her child 

She grew up to be a force of nature. Shining incandescent at the sumptuous parties held at her parents mansion. So it’s hardly surprising that thanks to her mega watt personality, not to mention looks, wealth and her powerfully politically placed parents, suitors were lining up for Angelica.

And yet the man she choose was one nobody could have guessed.

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And that man was not Alexander Hamilton! via giphy

John Church was a roguish Englishman now residing in America. The reasons for his transatlantic move were foggy at best and downright shady AF at worst! With rumours rife that Church had killed a man in a duel and was in mountainous debt in his native England. Troubling? Yes. But none of this mattered because John Church supplied arms to the American Revolutionary cause.

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via giphy

Unsurprisingly Daddy Schuyler wasn’t exactly thrilled at his eldest daughters choice in a men. Espically as she was incredibly young and about to get mixed up with a sketchy suitor. But the heart wants what it wants (and teenagers are want to make terrible life choices) so Church and Angelica exchanged love letters in secret. Not long after, in 1777 they took the plunge and eloped. A year later Angelica was pregnant with the couples first child.

Ok, Let’s hit pause for a moment. Now if you’re here because you’re fan of the musical Hamilton, then I’m guessing right you’re probably feeling a tad confused. You were expecting an Angelica, Eliza and Alexander Hamilton love triangle right? Well guys I’m afraid that history is a lot more complicated than musical theatre, but stay with me, because history is also a lot more juicy – there’s duels, aslymns and yes, a love triangle in store…on that note:

Eliza

Elizabeth Schuyler was born in 1757, just a year after her older sister. Known as Eliza by friends and family, she was a tomboy at heart, with a potent mix of intelligence, warmth and determination. Mrs._Elizabeth_Schuyler_Hamilton

In the winter of 1779-1780 Eliza met Alexander Hamilton, an upstart from the West Indies who had emigrated to America and risen to become General George Washingtons right hand man!

Hamilton fell fast for Eliza, writing furvant letters to Angelica about his new love and also suggesting that the revolutionary armies chances of success would be greatly diminished if Eliza didn’t wed him…which is kinda weird and intense, but I guess it worked because in December 1780 the pair were married!

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Bonus Hercules Mulligan flower girl for fans of Hamilton.

Following the wedding Hamilton returned to his station as Leiutant Colonel and Angelicas husband John, made his fortune selling arms to the revolutionary troops. Eliza advised Hamilton on his military moves and by the time the revolutionary war ended, each couple were in a far better position than when it started.

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And they say war achieves nothing!

John Church secured a nice job in Parliament and so he, Angelica and their children set off for a new life in London (turns out possible deadly duels don’t mean a thing if you got that green).

Meanwhile Eliza, Hamilton and their growing brood settled in New York, where Hamilton dazzled in his leading role in Washingtons new cabinet. Working to settle the countries debts and set up a banking system (I know it sounds deathly dull but it was v necessary)

Eliza passionatly worked with her husband on his writing and plans, whilst across the pond Angelica had become the toast of London; joining the inner royal circle and hosting intellectual debates at her home – she transformed into quite the political influencer!

Though apart, the sisters remained close, Writing each frequently. But Eliza wasn’t the only person Angelica was writing. She was also one half of an increasingly flirtatious pen pal relationship with none other than Eliza’s husband!

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Yes what started with Hamilton gushing to Angelica about his love for her sister, turned into something much more devilish- via giphy

Angelica was discovering that her husband John was in fact deeply dull (probably because he had just become a British politician…) so its unsurprising that she poured herself out in letters to Hamilton, who in many ways was similar to herself; intellectual, witty and ballsy. Hamilton seemed to feel the same, writing to Angelica:

‘I seldom write to a lady without fancying the relation of lover and mistress,”

Again it’s intense/wierd (which seems to be Hamiltons trademark with the ladies) Surprisingly Eliza was aware of this relationship, with Angelica writing to her sister:

‘I love him very much and if you were as generous as the Old Romans you would lend him to me for a little while.’

Again, bit of a wierd thing to send your sister? For sure! But the real question is, did Angelica and Hamilton ever seal the deal?

The debate wages on…but probably not. Angelica was loyal to her sister; in the letter above she goes on to assure Eliza that her intentions will remain pure (aside from the whole ‘you sex your husband Mon-Thurs and I’ll have weekend sex custody’…thing). We also know that it’s unlikely the sisters would have remained as close as they did if Angelica and Hamilton had sex, as you’ll find out later, Eliza is not a woman you want to cheat on!

But Hamilton wasn’t the one Angelica was writing. In 1788 she first wrote Thomas Jefferson.

Thomas Jefferson
I mean who wouldn’t right?

The pair pinged letters back and forth, sharing their political musings and discussing the best way to visit each other and maybe even become travelling buddies (sounding less like founding fathers and more gap year students…)

Angelica also worked to convince Jefferson -an enthusiastic advocate of the French Revolution- to reconsider his views and help those at risk. Many of those most at peril during the French Revolution were her friends (in fact by 1794 two of her friends had already fallen victim to the terror; Madame de Gramont and Madame de Chatelet).

But Jefferson couldn’t be swayed, paying little attention to Angelicas accounts of French Revolutionary horror. Though he did manage to take the time to remind her that women were much happier when they weren’t involved in politics.

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via giphy

But If Angelica thought she had it bad, she didn’t have shit on Eliza.

In 1797 Hamilton published the Reyonolds pamphlet. A 95 page document (so less a pamphlet more a tome) outlining and apologising for his affair with one Maria Reynolds.

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Jeez, the title alone takes forever to read

Eliza was unsurprisingly humiliated and incredibly pissed off. She took Hamilton to task and burned all the letters they had ever sent each other (effective at the time, but making it incredibly hard for future historians to discover who Eliza was!)

Your husband telling literally everyone about his affair in painful detail is bad, but Eliza’s lot was about to get a whole lot worse.

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via giphy

In 1801 her oldest son, Philip was killed in a duel at the age of 19. The Hamilton’s were a wreck. And it wasn’t just the parents, their daughter, Angelica, was so deeply scarred by her brothers death that she had a mental breakdown.

Angelica eventually regressed into a state that she would never recover from. And she spent the next 50 years being cared for in a mental facility, only occasionally emerging into bouts of lucidity until her death aged 72.

During this time Hamilton and Eliza were pushed together by grief and rekindled thier relationship. It was to be short burst of happiness. In 1804 Hamilton was killed in a duel.

Now a widow Eliza was knocked once more by both her parents dying within months of each other.

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Please say it doesn’t get any worse!

Luckily by now Angelica was back home in America and the sisters lent on each other for support. Angelica became Eliza’s rock, something she desperately needed as when Alexander Hamilton died, he left not only a huge hole in her life, but a pile of ever increasing debts to be paid (because when it rains it fucking pours)

Ironically around the same time as Eliza lost her family home to her late husbands debt, Angelicas son was rolling in it. Even founding a new town on The outskirts of New York, which he named after his mum (the town of Angelica is still there today FYI) awwww for Angelica, but it was just more crap for Eliza.

With all this shittery you wouldn’t blame Eliza for just throwing her hands up and sinking under.

But she persisted. 

Yep, despite everything Eliza decided to spread as much good as she possibly could. And she didn’t do this by halves.

Eliza was known to take in homeless children and care for them. And in 1806 she set up New York’s first Orphanage, the Orphan Asylum Society (which sounds super child friendly…)

But she was dealt yet another blow in 1814 when Angelica died at the age of just 57.

Still, though devastated, Eliza peservered. In 1818 she set up the Hamilton Free School, which was the first educational institution in Washington Heights. In 1821 she became directness of the Orphanage she had set up, now directly looking after the 100+ children cared for there.

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Eliza later in life 

She continued her charity work but also fought tirelessly to create a legacy for her husband; extensivley chronicling his work. She wore a necklace containing scraps of a sonnet he wrote her, until she died in 1754 at the ripe age of 97.

But that’s not the end of Eliza’s story. Her orphanage is still running, over 200 years later. It’s now called Graham Windham and cares for children and families across New York. A legacy I am sure Eliza would be proud of.

The End

Well ok – not quite! ‘What about Peggy’ I hear you shout. and peggy!.gif

And Peggy 

Ok there isn’t enough time to go into all of Peggy’s life (another time) but I will leave you with this. Without Peggy there would not be this article, because Peggy saved god damn everyone.

In 1781 the Schuyler sisters were at home in Albany, New York. Eliza and Angelica were both heavy pregnant and hoping to get some much needed rest at the Schuyler Mansion. This was not to be, as a huge group of British Loyalists and native Americans encircled the home. They were looking for the sisters father, Philip, who was supposedly in charge of a revolutionary spy ring – he wasn’t at home, but the angry mob were’nt to know that.

The trapped women were terrified, and knowing they wouldn’t be able to fight (two pregnant women against a group of pissed off men with weapons probably won’t come out that well…) they ran upstairs and hid.

The mansion was quickly raided by the mob who were intent on finding and capturing Philip at any cost. The sisters stayed quiet, hidden upstairs, when they suddenly realised that their brothers newborn daughter was downstairs…right in the path of the angry mob. oh shit!.gif

Peggy didn’t waste anytime, she left the safety of her hiding place and leapt to her nieces aid. On her way downstairs she was confronted by the mob, who pointed a musket at her face and demanded to know where Philip was. Knowing that if she told the truth the sisters would all surely die, Peggy thought quickly, telling the loyalists that Philip had fled to tell the nearby town and fetch the troops.

Scared of military repercussions the men fled, but not before one particularly pissed off man threw a tomahawk at Peggy as she ran upstairs with her niece. It narrowly missed, inserting itself deeply into the banister where her head had just been.

Yet another reminder, if we needed one, that the Schuyler Sisters are the living end Sisters gif.gif

This was really interesting! Where can I find out more? You know what, there are loads of really amazing books and papers on the sisters and this era…but, I’m just gonna suggest if you haven’t already to go listen to Hamilton (and if you have already listened, then lets be real, your probably going to listen again now…)

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